A biography of louis leakey a kenyan paleoanthropologist

Learn how and when to remove this template message The Leakey boys had several nannies like their father before them. On his first day Leakey called for racial equality, like his father. Calling him a "lover of niggers", the students locked him in a wire cage, spat and urinated on him and poked him with sticks. The school administration blamed Leakey.

A biography of louis leakey a kenyan paleoanthropologist

Louis Leakey Save Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey 7 August — 1 October was a Kenyan paleoanthropologist and archaeologist whose work was important in demonstrating that humans evolved in Africa, particularly through discoveries made at Olduvai Gorge with his wife, fellow paleontologist Mary Leakey.

Having established a program of palaeoanthropological inquiry in eastern Africa, he also motivated many future generations to continue this scholarly work. Several members of Leakey's family became prominent scholars themselves.

Another of Leakey's legacies stems from his role in fostering field research of primates in their natural habitats, which he saw as key to understanding human evolution. Leakey also encouraged and supported many other Ph.

Leakey also played a major role in creating organizations for future research in Africa and for protecting wildlife there. Harry was the son of James Shirley Leakey —one of the eleven children of the portrait painter James Leakey. Harry Leakey was assigned to an established post of the Church Mission Society among the Kikuyu at Kabetein the highlands north of Nairobi.

The station was at that time a hut and two tents. Louis's earliest home had an earthen floor, a leaky thatched roofrodents and insects, and no heating system except for charcoal braziers.

The facilities slowly improved over time.

A biography of louis leakey a kenyan paleoanthropologist

The mission, a center of activity, set up a clinic in one of the tents, and later a girls' school. Harry was working on a translation of the Bible into the Gikuyu language. He had a distinguished career in the CMS, becoming canon of the station.

Both sisters married missionaries: Louis grew up, played, and learned to hunt with the native kikuyus. He also learned to walk with the distinctive gait of the Kikuyu and speak their language fluently, as did his siblings. He was initiated into the Kikuyu ethnic group, an event of which he never spoke, as he was sworn to secrecy.

It was home to his personal collection of natural objects, such as birds' eggs and skulls. All the children developed a keen interest in and appreciation of the pristine natural surroundings in which they found themselves.

They raised baby animals, later turning them over to zoos. Louis read a gift bookDays Before History, by H.

Halla juvenile fictional work illustrating the prehistory of Britain. He began to collect tools and was further encouraged in this activity by a role model, Arthur Loveridgefirst curator of the Natural History Museum in Nairobi, predecessor of the Coryndon Museum.

This interest may have predisposed him toward a career in archaeology. His father was also a role model: From — the entire family lived at May's mother's house in Reading, BerkshireEngland, while Harry recovered from neurastheniaand again in —, while May recovered from general frailty and exhaustion.

During the latter stay, Harry bought a house in Boscombe. The family sat out World War I in Africa. When the sea lanes opened again inthey returned to Boscombe, where Louis was sent to Weymouth Collegea private boys' school, when he was 16 years old.

In three years there, he did not do well and complained of hazing and rules that he considered an infringement on his freedom. Advised by one teacher to seek employment in a bank, he secured help from an English teacher in applying to St John's College, Cambridge.

He received a scholarship for his high scores on the entrance exams. Louis matriculated at the University of Cambridgehis father's alma mater, inintending to become a missionary to British East Africa.

He frequently told a story about his final exams. When he had arrived in Britain, he had notified the register that he was fluent in Swahili.

When he came to his finals, he asked to be examined in this language, and the authorities agreed.Louis Leakey. Louis Leakey, with wife Mary, was a famed paleoanthropologist who greatly contributed to world knowledge about humanity’s early ancestors. The search for the explanation of human origins is the goal and often life long commitment of many Anthropologists.

Every time a major discovery is made we move closer to discovering a piece of the puzzle that is human evolution. Major contributions have been made by a number of men and wom. Feb 18,  · Louis Leakey, with wife Mary, was a famed paleoanthropologist who greatly contributed to world knowledge about humanity’s early skybox2008.com: Aug 07, Kenyan (Kenya) People In This Group Louis Leakey.

Louis Leakey, with wife Mary, was a famed paleoanthropologist who greatly contributed to world knowledge about humanity’s early ancestors. Short Biography. Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey (7 August – 1 October ), also known as L. S. B. Leakey, was a Kenyan paleoanthropologist and archaeologist whose work was important in establishing human evolutionary development in Africa, particularly through discoveries made at Olduvai Gorge with his wife, fellow paleontologist Mary Leakey.

Richard Leakey Biography Richard Leakey is a famous paleoanthropologist and wild life conservationist, known for leading the expeditionsin Ethiopia's ‘Omo River’ district.

To know more about his childhood, career, profile and timeline read onPlace Of Birth: Nairobi.

Louis Leakey - Wikipedia